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Case Reports
June 1929

AN ATYPICAL CASE OF ORGANIC FOREIGN BODY IN A BRONCHUS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Oto-Laryngological Service at Bellevue Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1929;37(6):1251-1253. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1929.01930060128017
Abstract

Organic foreign bodies in the tracheobronchial tree have long been respected by the bronchoscopist because of their tendency to produce both a marked local and a constitutional reaction, and because of the difficulties incident to their removal.

The clinical picture of a typical case in which an organic foreign body, notably the peanut, has been aspirated is so striking as to leave a most vivid impression of grave illness.

Jackson and Spencer1 stated that the diagnosis of organic foreign body in the tracheobronchial tree is made from (1) the history, (2) dyspnea and restlessness, (3) toxemia and occasional delirium, (4) dusky cyanosis or intense pallor, (5) distressing cough with pinkishgray, thick, tenacious, purulent sputum and (6) irregular septic type of temperature with pulse and respiration high in proportion to the temperature. The physical examination in these cases usually shows a general diffuse bronchitis with accentuated signs at the point

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