[Skip to Navigation]
Case Reports
August 1929

THE FLUORESCENT PROPERTIES OF RINGWORM OF THE SCALP AS AN AID IN DIAGNOSIS

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Department of Pediatrics, University of California Medical

Am J Dis Child. 1929;38(2):339-341. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1929.01930080115012
Abstract

Ultraviolet light when passed through a glass filter containing nickel oxide will cause certain substances to fluoresce in a characteristic manner. Wood's glass, invented by Prof. R. W. Wood of Johns Hopkins University, or Chance's ultraviolet glass, developed by Chance Brothers of Smethwick,1 is a deep violet nickel oxide glass, which transmits only the shortest rays of the visible spectrum and between 70 and 80 per cent of the ultraviolet rays in the region between 3,000 and 4,000 angstrom units.1 Solutions of eosin, quinine, quinidine, zinc sulphate and sodium salicylate give a distinctive fluorescence under such a light. Petrolatum, hydrous wool fat, mustard dried on cloth,1 dried blood and semen,2 and cerumen from the ear can be detected under Wood's light by their fluorescent properties. The normal skin and hair fluoresce faintly, the finger-nails fluoresce rather more brightly with a bluish tinge, and the teeth appear

×