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January 1930

HEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCIC SEPTICEMIA: REPORT OF A CASE WITH RECOVERY IN AN INFANT, AND A REVIEW OF FORTY-THREE CASES OF GENERAL SEPSIS

Am J Dis Child. 1930;39(1):157-162. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1930.01930130169018
Abstract

Septicemias caused by the streptococcus are among the most frequently encountered, as well as the most dreaded, of all general infections. In the greater percentage of cases, there is a fatal termination. Cooke1 noted: "All hemolytic streptococcic septicemias, with only occasional exceptions are characterized by being terminal, and are accompanied by an extremely severe toxemia." He tabulated the incidence of septicemia with positive blood culture that he observed at the St. Louis Children's Hospital, and noted that there were forty-eight cases of hemolytic streptococcic septicemia out of a total of 104 cases. This shows the great frequency of this particular strain of organism in the etiology of septicemia in infants and children. Again, he stated that in a group of sixty patients with streptococcic septicemia, fifty-one were due to hemolytic and nine to nonhemolytic strains of the organism. In only one instance in this series did recovery follow the

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