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Progress in Pediatrics
February 1930

CONGENITAL TRANSPOSITION OF CARDIAC VESSELS: A CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGIC STUDY

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES
From the Pathological Laboratories of the Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Dr. William G. Hibbs, attending pathologist.

Am J Dis Child. 1930;39(2):363-385. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1930.01930140125015
Abstract

Congenital transposition of the efferent vessels of the heart is defined by Abbott1 as "an alteration in the position of the two great vessels relative to the ventricles of the heart or to each other at their origin, so that they either spring from reversed ventricles, the aorta from the right and the pulmonary artery from the left chamber (complete transposition) or from the ventricles to which they normally belong, but in a reversed relationship (corrected transposition)." The cases of congenital heart disease with marked cyanosis referred to by older writers as morbus caeruleus are for the most part due to this condition, as cyanosis, as will be considered later in detail, is here of the most extreme and persistent type. This anomaly must be clearly distinguished from the type of transposition of the entire organ together with the vessels, so that it is in reality either a complete

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