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April 1930

INFLUENCE OF FEEDING ON CERTAIN ACIDS IN FECES OF INFANTS: IV. THE EFFECT OF AN EXCESS OF LACTOSE IN BREAST MILK AND IN WHOLE COW'S MILK ON THE EXCRETION OF VOLATILE ACIDS AND OF LACTIC ACID

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Pediatrics of Michael Reese Hospital, and the Northwestern University Medical School.

Am J Dis Child. 1930;39(4):729-735. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1930.01930160047005
Abstract

While it is generally agreed that volatile and lactic acids in infants' stools are formed by the fermentation of lactose in the intestine, our previous studies1 both with diluted cow's milk and with whole cow's milk have demonstrated that the amount of acid excreted is independent of the amount of lactose in the diet. Since the infants fed on whole cow's milk excreted as much as or even more volatile acid than the infants fed on breast milk, there must be a factor in cow's milk which facilitates the fermentation of lactose. In their clinical observations, Finkelstein and Meyer emphasized this point repeatedly; i. e., that carbohydrate is not harmful in itself, but only when given in a combination with cow's milk. They believe that the whey of cow's milk is the factor which acts as a catalyzer to intestinal fermentation. If the combination of carbohydrate and whole cow's

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