[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.203.142. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
July 1930

THE SCHILLING BLOOD COUNT IN THE PROGNOSIS OF ACUTE INFECTIONS IN INFANCY AND IN CHILDHOOD: PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the A. Jacobi Division for Children of the Lenox Hill Hospital, Service of Dr. Jerome S. Leopold.

Am J Dis Child. 1930;40(1):70-80. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1930.01940010081007
Abstract

The Schilling blood count varies from the usual differential count in the division of the polymorphonuclear neutrophils into groups according to the degree of their maturity. These cells are counted separately and tabulated to form a "hemogram." Repeated at frequent intervals in a given case and set up in vertical columns, the successive blood counts combine to form a comprehensive picture, more valuable than the ordinary count in the interpretation of an illness. When a curve of the repeated counts is plotted against the fever chart, the progress of an infection is shown graphically.

The Schilling count has been used abroad in adults (for a complete bibliography see Schilling-Gradwohl1). Several observers have given normal blood figures for infants and children, and there are sporadic reports of isolated cases. Complete investigations, however, have not been made in this field.

It is planned to continue these counts in a series of

×