[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.207.132.114. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
October 1930

THE PHYSIOLOGIC VARIATIONS IN THE INORGANIC BLOOD PHOSPHORUS CONTENT AT THE DIFFERENT AGE PERIODS: AN ATTEMPT TO EXPLAIN THESE IN THE GROWING CHILD

Author Affiliations

NEW ORLEANS
From the Department of Pediatrics, Tulane University of Louisiana.

Am J Dis Child. 1930;40(4):725-740. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1930.01940040022003
Abstract

Physiologic variation in the inorganic phosphorus content of the blood is a generally conceded fact. The blood of an infant is about twice as rich in phosphorus as adult blood; even at birth the blood phosphorus content has been found to be higher than that of the mother. But it is not definitely known what and where the phosphorus changes are, as the newly born infant passes through its infancy, childhood and adolescence to reach adult life with a blood phosphorus content of about one-half the original amount.

Of the inorganic constituents of the blood, calcium and phosphorus have proved to be the most important. The importance of these elements had been hinted by various authorities in the past, but their true relationship to each other and to certain bodily functions was not definitely established until comparatively recent times. The old authorities considered that rickets was a disease due to

×