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December 1930

INFANT FEEDING: WITH UNLIMITED AMOUNTS OF A CONCENTRATED AND A DILUTE COW'S MILK FORMULA

Author Affiliations

RAVINIA, ILL.; ANN ARBOR, MICH.
From the service of Dr. D. Murray Cowie, Department of Pediatrics and Infectious Diseases, University Hospital, Ann Arbor, Mich.

Am J Dis Child. 1930;40(6):1208-1214. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1930.01940060048004
Abstract

Nature intended that the young of all mammals should instinctively provide themselves with sufficient nourishment to sustain their life and to insure their growth. This was accomplished by means of a self-selected quantity of nourishment from their mother's breast. The congenitally weak perished, and only the fittest survived. With the advent of scientific artificial feeding, it became possible to avoid the loss of infant life resulting from nature's inadequacies. From time to time these methods of artificial feeding have been influenced by numerous nutritional theories. The majority of these theories were based on metabolic studies attempting to determine the caloric, protein and fluid requirements of the child. Clinical reports have largely concerned themselves with the relative superiority of various types of milk and milk modifications.

The recent experiences of investigators both in the laboratory and in clinical fields tend to indicate that normal animals and infants, when allowed unlimited selection,

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