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Case Reports
March 1931

AMYOTONIA: REPORT OF A CASE WITH HISTOLOGIC OBSERVATIONS

Author Affiliations

BUFFALO
From the Children's Hospital and the Laboratories of the Buffalo General Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1931;41(3):591-602. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1931.01940090108011
Abstract

In 1900, Oppenheim1 described a disease of infants and young children that is characterized by weakness, hypotonia and loss of reflexes, without disturbances of mentality or of sensation. He believed that the disease was due to a delayed development of the lower motor neuron and of the voluntary muscles, because the disease often ended in recovery. While amyotonia congenita is a comparatively rare disease, in 1917 Faber2 collected 115 cases, with 27 anatomic reports. This group does not include cases which from their description appear to be cases of amyotonia congenita, but which have been classified as the type of muscular atrophy described by Werdnig3 and Hoffman.4 According to Greenfield and Stern,5 and Grinker,6 there is no clinical differentiation possible in these two diseases. The Werdnig-Hoffman type of muscular atrophy has been considered familial as opposed to Oppenheim's disease, but familial cases of Oppenheim's

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