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May 1931

DRIED POWDERED MILK PREPARATIONS USED IN THE FEEDING OF INFANTS: A BACTERIOLOGIC STUDY

Author Affiliations

Attending Pediatrician of the New York Foundling Hospital; Bacteriologist of the New York Foundling Hospital NEW YORK
From the New York Foundling Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1931;41(5):1100-1103. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1931.01940110094007
Abstract

The increasing use of powdered milk in food products for infants, together with the higher sanitary plane to which this new industry is aspiring, has directed attention to the vital question of sanitation in vogue at the present time.

In 1917, G. F. Dick and Gladys H. Dick1 reported the presence of hemolytic or viridans types of streptococci in four of five samples of powdered milk that they examined, and they concluded that the methods of manufacture do not destroy organisms carried in the milk previous to its manufacture. Delépine2 showed that the surviving tubercle bacilli were still capable of producing progressive tuberculosis in guinea-pigs inoculated subcutaneously with milk containing the bacilli. Furthermore, he found that there was material recontamination of the powder after manufacture. The uncertainty of the destruction of tubercle bacilli and of the various types of streptococci, which was noted also by G. J. Hucker

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