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March 1934

ACUTE POLIOMYELITIS: THERAPY BY BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS FROM IMMUNE DONORS

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN
From the Department of Laboratories of the Israel-Zion Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1934;47(3):533-547. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1934.01960100059007
Abstract

The epidemic of poliomyelitis of 1931 in Brooklyn afforded a unique opportunity to investigate the effects of immune serum therapy on patients with poliomyelitis in its various stages. It was maintained by Flexner and Lewis1 and by Landsteiner and Levaditi2 that immune serum protects monkeys against infection with the poliomyelitis virus. Hence one would suspect that immune serum acts favorably also in the human species. The favorable effects of immunotherapy are expected only so far as the immune bodies can combat the infection and prevent impairment of the central nervous system. In cases, however, in which paralysis has set in, maintenance of life is the most that one can look for from such treatment, while the management of paralysis and its sequelae pertains to the realm of orthopedics and pediatrics.

I could not study the effects of animal serums as they were not available at the time. Convalescent

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