[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
June 1934

POLIOMYELITIS: II. RESULTS OF TREATMENT IN THE ACUTE DISEASE; ANALYSIS OF REPORTS ON 4,400 PATIENTS TREATED WITH SERUM; OBSERVATIONS ON 2,660 UNTREATED PATIENTS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Surgery, Division of Orthopedics, the University of Chicago.

Am J Dis Child. 1934;47(6):1216-1255. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1934.01960130040002
Abstract

In recent years the treatment of acute poliomyelitis by serums has received publicity in the medical literature. Although treatment by convalescent serum was first proposed by Netter, Gendron and Touraine1 in 1911, the problem did not receive consideration in this country until the spectacular epidemics of 1916 in New York and New England and of 1917 in the midwestern states. Numerous brief studies on serum therapy were available at that time, but until recently,2 there has never been data available from a sufficient number of cases to judge the results accurately. Recently authors have approached the subject by an attempt to evaluate statistically the apparent clinical improvement that has been frequently observed in the treatment of early acute poliomyelitis. Without exception, they have adduced favorable evidence for reduction both in mortality rate and in incidence and degree of paralysis, most strikingly observed in the preparalytic form of the

×