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August 1934

ACETARSONE IN THE TREATMENT OF CONGENITAL SYPHILIS: A COMPARISON WITH BISMUTH THERAPY

Am J Dis Child. 1934;48(2):272-280. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1934.01960150031003
Abstract

Certain disadvantages must have been noted by those who have had experience with the usual methods employed in the treatment of congenital syphilis. Among these may be mentioned: (a) the reluctance with which parents submit their children to treatment, with subsequent irregular attendance, and (b) the lack of muscular tissue in puny infants, which makes intramuscular injection difficult or impossible. Therefore, acetarsone, being a drug that can be given perorally, promised to lead to a decided step forward. To determine its efficacy I have used it exclusively in a group of infants and children for the past two years.

Acetarsone1 is not a new drug. It has been used in amebic dysentery,2 pemphigus,3 yaws,4 Vincent's angina,5 parasitic infestations,6 malaria7 and other conditions; but as this paper primarily deals with its use in congenital syphilis, I shall briefly review its history from that standpoint.

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