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October 1934

TUMORS OF THE BRAIN IN INFANCY: CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGIC STUDY

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
Fellow in Neurologic Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, 1931-1933.; From the neurosurgical laboratory of Washington University, St. Louis.

Am J Dis Child. 1934;48(4):739-763. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1934.01960170029003
Abstract

Tumors of the brain in infancy (that is, during the first two years of life) differ from those in later life in several respects. The alteration in intracranial physiology produced by an expanding lesion in an infant, in whom the sutures are ununited and the cranial bones yielding and elastic, differs greatly from the disturbances which result when a similar lesion develops in the closed and unyielding intracranial cavity of an adult. This fact accounts in a large measure for the differences in symptoms produced by tumors of the brain in infancy compared to those produced in adults. Differences in the predominant types of tumors and their sites of predilection in infancy also contribute to a clinical picture which differs in many respects from that seen in older persons suffering from tumors of the brain. The problem of diagnosis presents many features which are peculiar to this age period. While

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