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January 1935

CONTOUR OF THE CHEST IN CHILDREN: III. ENVIRONMENT

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS
From the Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota.

Am J Dis Child. 1935;49(1):52-59. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1935.01970010061005
Abstract

Reports that there is a difference in physical development between children reared in poor and those reared in favorable social environments have appeared in the literature for over a hundred years. In 1829, Villermé1 of France showed that proper food and good homes aid materially in physical development. Roberts,2 in 1878, after measuring several thousands of the male population in England, showed that boys from the higher social strata were heavier and taller. One year later, Bowditch,3 of Boston, concluded that persons in the so-called "favored classes" were superior in height and in weight to those in the "general classes." Later, in 1913, Young4 reported that in Chicago the children of wealthy parents were taller and heavier and had greater vital capacities than the average public school child. Likewise, Schlesinger,5 Wurzinger6 and Martin,7 in Germany, showed that there was a definite difference in

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