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January 1935

HISTOLOGY OF THE MIDOLIVARY REGION OF THE MEDULLA OBLONGATA IN THE NEW-BORN INFANT: OBSERVATIONS ON VESSELS AND CELLS

Author Affiliations

BOSTON; NEW YORK
From the Department of Neuropathology, Boston University School of Medicine, and Pathological Department, New York Lying-In Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1935;49(1):101-107. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1935.01970010110012
Abstract

In a detailed study of the medullae of fifty-three still-born premature and full term children which we1 made to determine the presence or absence of microscopic hemorrhages, certain observations of histologic interest repeated themselves. It seemed striking that there were so few vessels in the medulla (fig. 1), considering the importance of the structure, and not only how few but how small the largest of the vessels were. In measuring the thickness of the walls of 750 vessels it was found that they varied from the width of a single endothelial cell in the capillaries to 250 microns. The largest were found in the pia (still of cerebral type), where unexpectedly the arterioles exceeded the veins in number. This recalls Craigie's2 work, except that he measured the diameters of capillaries instead of the thickness of their walls, so that he had data on the caliber, which, as he

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