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March 1935

PROPHYLAXIS OF SIMPLE ANEMIA IN INFANCY WITH IRON AND COPPER: EFFECT ON HEMOGLOBIN, WEIGHT AND RESISTANCE TO INFECTION

Author Affiliations

MONTREAL, CANADA
From the Children's Memorial Hospital and the Department of Pædiatrics, Montreal General Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1935;49(3):642-657. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1935.01970030088008
Abstract

Interest in the subject of the present study was stimulated on reading Mackay's1 report on nutritional anemia in infancy. The conclusions reached in that report, if confirmed, would demand that all children during the first year or two of life receive a fairly large daily supplement of iron.

The literature on anemia in infancy has been adequately covered in the aforementioned report, and only additional pertinent contributions will be referred to here. The most intriguing of recent publications are those dealing with the possibility that copper may play a significant rôle in the synthesis of hemoglobin. The results of the experiments of Elvehjem and Hart2 on animals to the effect that, whereas impure inorganic salts of iron cured nutritional anemia, the pure salts failed to do so, unless supplemented by small amounts of copper, have already been applied by clinicians to the treatment of anemia. The most carefully

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