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Case Reports
June 1935

HYPOTHYROIDISM AND CRETINISM IN CHILDHOOD: IV. POSTMORTEM REPORTS ON TWO CRETINS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Departments of Pediatrics and Pathology and the Research and Educational Hospital, University of Illinois College of Medicine.

Am J Dis Child. 1935;49(6):1564-1569. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1935.01970060168014
Abstract

CLASSIFICATION OF THYROID DEFICIENCY  Pathologically, three types of thyroid deficiency in children can be recognized. Parker classified them as cases in which there is (1) absence of the gland, (2) atrophy of the gland or (3) enlargement of the gland.Absence of the Gland.—Athyreosis, or absence of the thyroid gland, may result from failure of the gland to develop during the embryonic period or from wasting of a more or less completely developed gland at some time during or shortly after intra-uterine life. In 1850 Curling1 reported two cases in which the thyroid body was found to be absent on postmortem examination. One patient was a girl aged 10 and the other a girl aged 6 months. In the second case, in addition to the absence of thyroid tissue, there was evidence of incomplete development of the anterior lobes of the cerebrum. The reports of these two cases

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