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July 1935

STATE OF CALCIUM IN THE FLUIDS OF THE BODY: II. CALCIUM IN THE BLOOD IN RICKETS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Division of Orthopedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, the Physiological Laboratory and the Lasker Foundation for Medical Research, the University of Chicago.

Am J Dis Child. 1935;50(1):77-83. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1935.01970070086007
Abstract

The literature and the theoretical considerations concerning the rôle of calcium in the formation of bone, and more particularly in rickets, have recently been reviewed by Peters and Van Slyke.1 An extensive review is therefore unnecessary here. Since the work of Howland and Marriott,2 it has been generally agreed that while the total calcium content of the serum is occasionally low in rickets such a reduction is not a consistent or a necessary factor in the pathologic physiology of this disease.

Benjamin and Hess3 recently studied the state of calcium in normal and rachitic serums, using a combination of the methods of adsorption and ultrafiltration. They concluded that of the diffusible calcium from normal serum about two thirds is in the form of an adsorbable calciumphosphorus complex. In rickets they found a diminution in the adsorbable fractions of calcium and an increase in the fractions designated by

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