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October 1935

PATHOGENESIS OF TUBERCULOSIS IN MAN: CERTAIN GOVERNING PRINCIPLES AND THE CAUSAL RELATIONSHIP EXISTING BETWEEN PRIMARY AND REINFECTION TYPES OF THE DISEASE

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS
From the Lymanhurst School and the Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota.

Am J Dis Child. 1935;50(4):853-871. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1935.01970100029003
Abstract

A consideration of the principles involved in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis in man and of the causal relationship which exists between primary and reinfection types of the disease leads one into a controversial field and necessitates careful analyses of direct and indirect evidence bearing on these points. At the present time, many and possibly the majority of physicians favor the opinion that a tuberculous infection confers a degree of protective immunity on the patient which operates to diminish thereafter the chances of serious forms of tuberculosis developing. According to this view, when equal average chances for infection by uncontrolled contact exist per group, the infected tuberculin-sensitive portion of the population is expected to withstand reinfection with greater success than that with which the remaining nonallergic, presumably unprotected part resists accidental primary infection. Certain experimental work, together with deductions from clinical observations on man, lends considerable support to those who contend

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