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October 1935

RESPIRATORY METABOLISM IN INFANCY AND IN CHILDHOOD: XVI. EFFECT OF INTRAVENOUS INFUSIONS OF FAT ON THE ENERGY EXCHANGE OF INFANTS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the New York Hospital and the Department of Pediatrics, Cornell University Medical College.

Am J Dis Child. 1935;50(4):894-912. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1935.01970100072007
Abstract

The parenteral administration of fat as a potential source of energy has long appealed to clinical investigators. Evidence of the availability to the organism of fat so administered has for the most part been adduced by indirect methods of approach. Such studies include: chemical analyses of the blood; chemical and histologic examination of the sites of injection, regional lymph nodes and various viscera following parenteral administration of fat; studies of nitrogen balance; studies of absorption and excretion of fat-soluble drugs and dyes; observations on the utilization of fat-soluble vitamins, and finally clinical records of the response of malnourished persons to repeated injections of fat. The results secured from these indirect lines of investigation are far from conclusive, but they suggest that some preparations may be utilized by the organism under certain conditions. The literature covering these studies, which has accumulated since the experiments of von Leube1 in 1895, was

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