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January 1936

THE SEVENTH NERVE AS A POSSIBLE PATHWAY FOR THE TRANSMISSION OF THE VIRUS OF POLIOMYELITIS: I. CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS

Am J Dis Child. 1936;51(1):58-68. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1936.01970130067004
Abstract

The production of the spinal type of lesion usually seen in human beings with poliomyelitis can be best explained by assuming that the factor that causes the disease enters through the gastro-intestinal tract and from there spreads to the spinal cord by way of the sympathetic nervous system.1 The production of the bulbar type of the disease may be explained by assuming that the virus can also spread from the gastro-intestinal tract to the medullary area by way of the axis-cylinders of both vagus nerves.2 Symptoms of illness become evident as soon as the nucleus ambiguus is involved. The other cranial nerves, or components, especially the nuclei of the third, sixth, ninth and eleventh nerves situated in the medullary area, may also become involved, but only secondarily. Occasionally the nucleus of the seventh nerve becomes paralyzed along with the other nuclei. There are a few cases of the

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