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February 1936

SUBSTANCES INVOLVED IN THE COAGULATION OF THE BLOOD OF THE NEW-BORN INFANTV. STUDIES OF FIBRINOGEN

Am J Dis Child. 1936;51(2):311-312. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1936.01970140075008
Abstract

In connection with our studies of fibrinogen in the blood of the new-born infant, it seemed desirable to determine what effect if any an intramuscular injection of the mother's whole blood has on the infant's fibrinogen. Injection of blood or serum has become the generally accepted treatment for hemorrhagic disease of new-born infants since first introduced by Welch1 in 1910, but the mechanism by which it is effective in checking hemorrhage is still unknown.

Normal new-born infants were used for the study. All were put to the breast at regular four hour intervals and were given water freely, but no supplementary food was given. Blood was drawn for the determination of fibrin daily for a control period of from two to four days. After the last control sample had been drawn, 7 cc. of the mother's whole blood, uncitrated, was injected into the muscles of the infant's thigh. Determinations

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