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March 1936

MENTAL DETERIORATION ASSOCIATED WITH CONVULSIONS AND HYPOGLYCEMIA: REPORT OF TWO CASES

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.
From the Department of Pediatrics of the Yale University School of Medicine and the Pediatric Service of the New Haven Hospital and Dispensary.

Am J Dis Child. 1936;51(3):575-582. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1936.01970150079005
Abstract

The discovery of hypoglycemic shock which follows the removal of the liver and overdosage with insulin has led to reports of a number of cases of convulsions in children associated with a low concentration of the blood sugar. Undoubted cases of convulsions due to a low concentration of blood sugar have been associated with tumors of the islets of Langerhans. The following cases are of interest in that they show how difficult the interpretation of a low blood content associated with convulsions may be.

REPORT OF CASES  Case 1.—Mary A., was born in the obstetric service of the New Haven Hospital on March 3, 1927, after an estimated gestation of seven months. The weight at birth was 1,190 Gm.; the length, 37 cm., and the circumference of the head, 28 cm. The mother was treated in the obstetric ward for toxemia of pregnancy, with vomiting, hypertension and albuminuria. Labor was

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