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Case Reports
June 1936

ESSENTIAL XANTHOMATOSIS: TREATMENT WITH CHOLESTEROL-FREE DIET IN TWO CASES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Chemical Laboratory, Babies Hospital, and the Pediatric Service, Mount Sinai Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1936;51(6):1372-1384. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1936.01970180118009
Abstract

Rowland1 defined essential xanthomatosis as "a heredofamilial, constitutional disorder of metabolism in which a deposition of fat-like mixtures, particularly cholesterol and its ester, takes place in the tissues and blood.... The pathologic change appears in the form of granuloma-like accumulations arising in various parts of the body." Since an accumulation of excessive amounts of cholesterol is a dominant feature of this disease, restriction of cholesterol in the diet is a rational therapeutic procedure, and it has been tried in a few instances, with considerable success. Herrmann and Nathan2 observed definite clinical improvement in two patients after treatment with a low cholesterol diet (P flanzenkost), the description of which was not given. In one of them the cholesterol content of the blood serum decreased from 580 to 300 mg. per hundred cubic centimeters during four months on the diet; in the other the amount of serum cholesterol remained within

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