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July 1936

BASAL ENERGY METABOLISM AND CREATININE IN THE URINE: I. OBSERVATIONS ON CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Department of Pediatrics, the Harvard University Medical School, and the Infants' and Children's Hospitals.

Am J Dis Child. 1936;52(1):16-24. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1936.04140010025002
Abstract

Clinicians dealing with the basal metabolism of children have often drawn conclusions based on the standards in common use which subsequent clinical experience failed to justify. The commonly used standards based on body surface are especially troublesome in determinations on children, although they have apparently been satisfactory in studies on adults. When the heat production of children is referred to the expected heat production for height or weight, the energy metabolism corresponds more satisfactorily with clinical experience than when standards based on body surface are used. Even here one encounters difficulties in abnormally developed children.

Another method of approach to the problem is suggested by the theory that active protoplasmic mass is the fundamental source of the heat produced in the body.1 If this theory is correct, a dependable measurement of protoplasmic mass should help to clear up some of the present difficulties in the evaluation of heat production.

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