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Progress in Pediatrics
July 1936

CEREBRAL BIRTH CONDITIONS: II. THE RÔLE OF INTRA-UTERINE INFECTION AND INTOXICATION IN MAN

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Laboratory of Neuropathology in the Institute of the Pennsylvania Hospital, and the Graduate School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania.

Am J Dis Child. 1936;52(1):144-167. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1936.04140010153014
Abstract

INTRODUCTION  Probably no group of neurologic conditions is less well defined than that heterogeneous group which is spoken of as Little's disease and which has come to include, regardless of the clinical picture, almost any infantile organic nervous disorder, whether it is remotely or closely related to an injury at birth. This oversimplification has been most unfortunate, for it has naturally obscured the nature of the various disorders and it implies a common etiology. This has been true with regard to clinical classification as well as etiologic and pathologic characteristics. Because of this very obscurity, it has seemed best to us to refer to these disorders as "cerebral birth conditions," meaning thereby not so much conditions which are caused by injury at birth as conditions which are present at birth, whether they are due to trauma or to intra-uterine conditions. The term in itself is not a diagnosis, but it

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