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September 1936

ERYTHROCYTES AND HEMOGLOBIN OF THE BLOOD IN INFANCY AND IN CHILDHOOD: I. SIZE AND HEMOGLOBIN CONTENT OF THE ERYTHROCYTES IN NUTRITIONAL ANEMIA

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI
From the Children's Hospital Research Foundation and the Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati.

Am J Dis Child. 1936;52(3):616-626. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1936.04140030106009
Abstract

The term nutritional anemia designates a type of anemia especially prevalent among infants of 1 and 2 years, currently thought to be due mainly to lack of iron, which, derived either from stores in the body or from food, is needed for building hemoglobin. The severe form of the disease is seen most frequently among infants who have too long been given an exclusive milk diet, but it is seen also among infants who have been offered a seemingly well balanced diet. In most instances the anemia tends to improve spontaneously, as a rule coincidentally with the increasing acceptance of a well balanced diet, but even in infants who recover spontaneously (i. e., without iron medication) the period of transitory anemia is a critical one, in which the hazards of intercurrent infection and general nutritional disturbances are increased. The evidence produced by recent investigations1 that there is a higher

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