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Progress in Pediatrics
February 1937

JAUNDICE IN CHILDREN: REPORT OF SIX CASES OF ICTERUS GRAVIS NEONATORUM

Am J Dis Child. 1937;53(2):541-575. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1937.04140090114010
Abstract

(Concluded from page 154) 

REPORT OF SIX CASES OF ICTERUS GRAVIS  In the literature on jaundice in the new-born many writers 40 stress the point that three types of jaundice are characterized in a varying degree by edema, anemia, jaundice, enlargement of the liver and spleen, the presence of numerous nucleated red blood cells in the peripheral blood and numerous extramedullary hematopoietic foci. Common to the three types is the observation post mortem of extramedullary islands of blood formation. In the past, if edema was the most prominent element, the condition was spoken of as congenital hydrops foetalis, or universal edema of the new-born; if jaundice was most marked, masking the underlying anemia, the term icterus gravis neonatorum was used, and if anemia was most prominent, congenital anemia of the new-born was the term used. If in addition to enlargement of the liver and spleen, together with jaundice and anemia,

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