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Case Reports
May 1937

CONGENITAL ABSENCE OF THE RIGHT PULMONARY ARTERY IN A NEW-BORN INFANT: WITH RESULTING NECROSIS OF THE LUNG AND SPONTANEOUS PNEUMOTHORAX

Author Affiliations

NEWARK, OHIO
From the pediatric service of the Newark Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1937;53(5):1268-1272. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1937.04140120092007
Abstract

Seventeen cases of spontaneous pneumothorax of the new-born have been reported, and these cases were collected and reviewed recently by Glaser and Landau.1 A painstaking search of the literature has failed to yield any reports of cases in which there was a complete absence of the right pulmonary artery.

The cases in which the etiology of the pneumothorax could be discovered fell into three general classes (Willi2): (1) those in which the condition was mechanical, or in which artificial respiration or mechanical obstruction by a thymus is supposed to have precipitated the rupture of a normal or emphysematous lung; (2) those in which the condition was infectious, or in which an abscess of the lung had ruptured, and (3) those in which congenital defects of the lung or congenital emphysema acting with or without abnormal mechanical strain resulted in rupture.

In this report, I wish to add one

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