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Children's Electrocardiograms
June 1937

II. THE CHANGES IN CHILDREN'S ELECTROCARDIOGRAMS PRODUCED BY RHEUMATIC AND CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE

Author Affiliations

NEW ORLEANS
From the Heart Station of the Charity Hospital and the Department of Physiology, Louisiana State University Medical Center.

Am J Dis Child. 1937;53(6):1470-1484. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1937.04140130048005
Abstract

RHEUMATIC HEART DISEASE  Many of the first electrocardiographic studies that were carried out (Butterfield,1 White2 and Emanuel3) emphasized the disturbance in conduction which appeared during the course of rheumatic fever. In addition to defects in conduction, Cohn and Swift4 pointed out the changes in the ventricular complex produced by rheumatic fever. They followed the course of the disease closely, taking 2,591 electrocardiograms in 37 cases. Shortly afterwards White and Burwell5 pointed out the incidence of predominance of the right ventricle and prominent P waves with rheumatic mitral stenosis. In 1926 Bain and Hamilton6 studied 50 children, aged from 4½ to 14, some of whom showed only rheumatic carditis and others valvular lesions in addition. Their paper does not give a true idea of either the frequency or the extent of defects in conduction with these conditions in children because they neglected to give the

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