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July 1937

TUBERCLE BACILLI IN THE GASTRIC WASHINGS OF INFANTS AND OF CHILDRENDEMONSTRATION WHEN THE CUTANEOUS REACTION TO TUBERCULIN IS POSITIVE BUT THERE IS NO EVIDENCE OF TUBERCULOSIS ON PHYSICAL OR ROENTGENOGRAPHIC EXAMINATION

Am J Dis Child. 1937;54(1):47-59. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1937.01980010056005
Abstract

That pulmonary tuberculosis may occur in infants and in children with few if any local or constitutional manifestations has been universally recognized. The diagnosis must necessarily rest on the demonstration of tubercle bacilli in the sputum. It is difficult and in most cases impossible to obtain sputum from infants and from younger children, since such young patients do not expectorate but swallow the sputum and the coughed-up mucus. Examination of the gastric washings for tubercle bacilli, therefore, has become a diagnostic measure of importance in cases of suspected pulmonary tuberculosis in infants and in children. The procedure is a simple one and can be carried out readily.

Gastric lavage with examination of the sediment obtained by centrifuging the stomach washings in cases of tuberculosis was first described by Meunier,1 in 1898. Meunier's method was not employed extensively until interest in the procedure was reawakened by the publication of Armand-Delille

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