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February 1938

STUDIES OF FETAL RESPIRATORY MOVEMENTS: II. RECORDING METHODS

Author Affiliations

SALT LAKE CITY
From the University of Utah School of Medicine.

Am J Dis Child. 1938;55(2):322-329. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1938.01980080093006
Abstract

Recently Rosenfeld and Snyder1 transected the spinal cords of experimental animals in order to avoid the depressing action of anesthetics or analgesics when observing the intra-uterine respiration-like movements of fetuses. Observation of such fetal activity is not new; in fact, in the early part of this century a lively controversy occurred over the existence of fetal respiratory movements. It is not our purpose to discuss this particular phase of the subject at the present time, for we have done so in a previous communication.2 It suffices to state that we are inclined to agree with Ahlfeld,3 Reifferscheid4 and Rosenfeld and Snyder5 that such movements occur and that in all probability they are physiologic. Indeed, it is hard to reconcile oneself to the belief that the fetal respiratory tract in utero remains inert, awaiting only the proper stimulus to initiate its hitherto unpracticed mechanism at birth,

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