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April 1938

HYSTERICAL BLINDNESS IN CHILDREN: REPORT OF TWO CASES

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Department of Pediatrics and the Department of Ophthalmology, Mount Zion Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1938;55(4):743-749. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1938.01980100079003
Abstract

Hysterical amblyopia, according to Fuchs,1 occurs for the most part in young persons, particularly in girls. The literature on this subject shows, however, that a large majority of case reports have concerned adults, and comparatively few, children.

In a number of instances in which the hysterical type of amblyopia was said to have been present in a child, the diagnosis was open to question. When the condition is unilateral, amblyopia ex anopsia and congenital amblyopia must be ruled out carefully before a definite diagnosis of the hysterical type can be made. De Schweinitz2 recorded a case of unilateral hysterical amblyopia in a child of 11, observed one in a child of 14, and cited one seen in a child of 11 by Pitres. When amblyopia is bilateral, as is more frequently the case, one is on firmer ground. Bilateral hysterical amblyopia in children was observed by Burch,3

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