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May 1938

METABOLISM AND MODE OF ACTION OF VITAMIN D: III. IMPORTANCE OF THE LIVER FOR ITS ANTIRACHITIC EFFICACY

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
From the Babies and Childrens Hospital, and the Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Western Reserve University.

Am J Dis Child. 1938;55(5):913-923. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1938.01980110019002
Abstract

The only fact that can be stated with any degree of certainty concerning the mode of action of vitamin D is that vitamin D cures rickets by readjusting the disturbed phosphorus and calcium metabolism. Difficulties are encountered when an attempt is made to explain the increase in the content of inorganic phosphate in the blood of rachitic subjects or that of calcium in the blood of spasmophilic infants—adjustments that take place under the influence of this vitamin. It still remains extremely doubtful whether the absorption theory of Howland1 and Kramer can explain the action of vitamin D in human rickets.2 Moreover, the theory that irradiated ergosterol (viosterol) stimulates an endocrine gland, which has been proposed by Erdheim,3 Pappenheimer and Minor,4 Ritter5 and Nitschke,6 must also be considered open to question.7

Gerstenberger8 in 1933 suggested that the action of vitamin D is concerned

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