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June 1938

INSENSIBLE PERSPIRATION IN CHILDREN: IV. THE INFLUENCE OF SALT

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the pediatric service of Dr. Béla Schick, Mount Sinai Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1938;55(6):1176-1184. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1938.01980120038003
Abstract

Many investigators1 have called attention to the close relation between the total heat production and the amount of heat dissipated through insensible perspiration. Soderstrom and DuBois2 have shown that the proportion of dissipated heat is about 24 per cent in normal as well as in diseased subjects. Levine and his associates3 demonstrated that about the same proportion exists in infancy. In a previous publication4 we have shown that this relation holds throughout childhood. So constant is the correlation, in fact, that formulas have been derived and graphic curves have been constructed which enable one to make a reasonably accurate prediction of the total energy metabolism from the measured insensible loss of weight.5 This correlation is maintained at any level of the body temperature, so long as that level remains constant.

It is important to note that the correlation between the total heat production and the

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