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Progress in Pediatrics
September 1938

CARCINOMA OF THE THYROID GLAND IN CHILDREN: REPORT OF A CASE ASSOCIATED WITH MULTIPLE ANOMALIES OF DEVELOPMENT, WITH STUDIES OF BASAL METABOLISM, SERUM CHOLESTEROL AND CREATINE EXCRETION AFTER THYROIDECTOMY

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Babies Hospital and the Department of Diseases of Children, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University.

Am J Dis Child. 1938;56(3):616-638. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1938.01980150136013
Abstract

Carcinoma of the thyroid gland is rare in children. Hare1 reported that in 15,000 thyroid glands operated on at the Lahey Clinic there were 258 instances, or 1.7 per cent, of primary malignant tumor of the gland; 6 of the tumors occurred in children under 14 years of age. Kennedy,2 reporting from the Mayo Clinic, estimated that about 1 per cent of carcinomas of the thyroid gland affect children.

The following report describes the case of a 4 year old girl who in addition to the carcinoma of the thyroid gland showed bilateral congenital dislocation of the hips, spina bifida of the first sacral segment and small shadows of calcium density scattered throughout the cerebrum, as well as retinal lesions.

Laboratory studies of the child made after thyroidectomy added points of interest. After the surgical removal of the thyroid gland such children offer problems similar to those encountered

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