[Skip to Navigation]
[Skip to Navigation Landing]
Other Articles
October 1938

HUMAN PASSIVE TRANSFER ANTIBODY: IV. STUDIES ON CHILDREN HYPERSENSITIVE TO FOODS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the New York Hospital and the Department of Pediatrics, Cornell University Medical College.

Am J Dis Child. 1938;56(4):797-804. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1938.01980160077009
Abstract

Weil,1 Coca2 and von Fenyvessy and Freund3 have shown that the anaphylactic state is still demonstrable after anaphylactic antibodies are removed from the blood. Since hypersensitiveness can be transferred by antibodies, they must be associated with the anaphylactic state, but only after they reach the tissues.

The assumption that circulating antibodies protect sensitized tissues from anaphylaxis is paradoxic to the evidence that they induce sensitization. In a recent communication4 we presented suggestive evidence of protection by human passive transfer antibody. The blood serums of a group of patients with hay fever were titrated by a technic which depends on neutralization of antibody by antigen. It was observed that the antibody titer increased after injection of pollen extracts in 16 of 18 patients and that relief from clinical symptoms of hay fever was associated with a rise in titer. Two patients who showed no rise in titer

×