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November 1938

VITAMIN C IN HUMAN PREGNANCY AND LACTATION: II. STUDIES DURING LACTATION

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Harvard School of Public Health, the Boston Lying-in Hospital and the Children's Medical Service of the Massachusetts General Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1938;56(5):1011-1019. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1938.01980170057009
Abstract

In the preceding communication,1 it has been shown that the fetus acts as a parasite on the mother for its vitamin C and that the requirement of the mother for this substance is therefore considerably increased during pregnancy. In this paper, we shall present data on the vitamin C content of breast milk and of maternal and infant blood plasma during the nursing period.

In 1936, several investigators reported on the vitamin C content of human milk. Kasahara and Kawashima's2 values were between 4.2 and 5.6 mg. per hundred cubic centimeters, and Wachholder's3 averaged 4.4 mg. Stoerr4 reported an average of 3 mg. and found the figure slightly higher for colostrum. De Haas and Meulemans5 found the colostrum of native Indian and Chinese women to contain 5 mg. of ascorbic acid per hundred cubic centimeters, while milk sampled later in the puerperium contained about 4

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