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July 1939

EFFECT OF SLEEP ON INSENSIBLE PERSPIRATION IN INFANTS AND CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Normal Child Development Study of the Department of Diseases of Children, Columbia University, and the Babies Hospital, New York.

Am J Dis Child. 1939;58(1):82-91. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1939.01990070094009
Abstract

Within the past few years, papers by Levine and his co-workers1 and also papers by Ginandes and Topper2 and by Law3 have indicated that the determination of insensible perspiration by the method of weighings at intervals during short periods (one and one-half to four hours) is a satisfactory way to estimate basal heat production. In the case of infants, according to the technic of Levine and that of Law, the subjects should be asleep. Not only does this insure as nearly uniform a basal metabolic state as possible, but the constant activity of infants and small children when awake disturbs the reading of the balance. It is the purpose of this paper to describe the changes in the rate of loss of weight (insensible perspiration) which accompany sleep and also the parallel changes in rectal and cutaneous temperature. These changes have been found to be unexpectedly large,

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