[Skip to Navigation]
Other Articles
October 1, 1939

FAMILIAL CLEIDOCRANIAL DYSOSTOSIS (CLEIDAL DYSOSTOSIS): A PREOSSEOUS AND DENTINAL DYSTROPHY

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Children's Memorial Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1939;58(4):786-798. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1939.04380010096009
Abstract

A family with four members who have defective or missing clavicles is unusual, as only a few such families have been described. However, the condition is not a recent discovery. The first case of these defects was recorded as early as 1766 by Morand.1 The first familial occurrence was reported over a century later by Cutter2 (1870). Because in all cases the contour of the skull showed a change, the name cleidocranial dysostosis was proposed by Marie and Sainton3 (1897). Involvement of more than one member of a family has occurred relatively frequently, and the total number of cases of hereditary or sporadic occurrence reported in the world literature is more than 130. Most reports have emphasized that the changes in these cases were inherent in membranous bones, but Fitchet4 in 1929 called attention to the fact that since the clavicles are formed from both cartilage and membrane both kinds

Add or change institution
×