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December 1939

EFFECT OF HYPERIMMUNE HUMAN SERUM (LYOPHILE) AND OF SULFAPYRIDINE ON EXPERIMENTAL MURINE PERTUSSIS

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, N. Y.
Mary Wold worked under a grant from the Fluid Research Fund of the University of Rochester.; From the Departments of Bacteriology and Pediatrics, the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry.

Am J Dis Child. 1939;58(6):1228-1233. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1939.01990110092005
Abstract

When mice are inoculated intranasally or intratracheally with saline suspensions of phase 1 Haemophilus pertussis, a definite lesion of the lungs results.1 This type of experimental infection affords a suitable method by means of which the protective qualities of various immunizing substances may be tested.

The present status of convalescent serum and of adult immune serum in the prevention and treatment of pertussis has been described by Bradford2 and by Meader.3 In order to enhance the protective power of immune human serum, Jundell,4 Kendrick5 and McGuinness, Stokes and Mudd6 have recently suggested that the donors receive injections of vaccine prior to the withdrawal of blood. Serum prepared in this manner is referred to as hyperimmune. McGuinness and his associates preserved the serum by the lyophile process in order to prevent diminution of the antibody titer during storage. Serum preserved by this method also can

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