[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.200.74. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
December 1939

EFFECT OF HYPERIMMUNE HUMAN SERUM (LYOPHILE) ON THE HUMORAL ANTIBODY TITER IN PERTUSSIS

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, N. Y.; PHILADELPHIA; ROCHESTER, N. Y.
From the Departments of Pediatrics and Bacteriology, the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, N. Y., and the Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

Am J Dis Child. 1939;58(6):1234-1239. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1939.01990110098006
Abstract

That convalescent blood when injected into infants exposed to pertussis confers a certain degree of protection appears to be established.1 Its value when injected after the onset of symptoms, however, has not been fully determined.

It would seem that the injection of immune serum during the catarrhal stage of pertussis would be indicated, since demonstrable antibodies do not normally appear until the height of infection occurs. Since the level of antibodies in the blood of recovered patients is relatively low, attempts have been made to increase the titer by inoculating immune adults with vaccine. Jundell2 gave injections of freshly prepared vaccine to donors a few days prior to the withdrawal of blood. Kendrick3 reported that the blood of hyperimmune donors was definitely protective when given to exposed infants. McGuinness, Stokes and Mudd4 suggested that hyperimmune human serum possesses definite prophylactic value. They also reported that 5

×