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January 1940

DIETARY AND METABOLIC STUDIES OF ESKIMO CHILDREN WITH AND WITHOUT DENTAL CARIES: INCLUDING STUDIES OF THE METABOLIC BALANCES OF CALCIUM, PHOSPHORUS AND NITROGEN

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Biological Chemistry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the School of Dental and Oral Surgery, Columbia University.; William J. Gies Fellow in Biological Chemistry in Columbia University, 1936, and Consultant Dentist, Office of Indian Affairs, United States Department of the Interior, 1937-1938.

Am J Dis Child. 1940;59(1):19-38. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1940.01990120021002
Abstract

The hypothesis that systemic conditions are concerned in the causation of dental caries has led to studies of metabolic balances of calcium, phosphorus and nitrogen in an effort to determine whether differences in the utilization of these elements exist in groups of persons with and without caries. Boyd, Drain and Stearns1 reported that a group of children without dental caries showed greater average retentions of calcium and phosphorus than a group with active decay, but no such difference was found for nitrogen. The results for calcium and phosphorus for a group of children with inactive caries were intermediate between those for the caries-free group and for the group with active caries. The retentions of calcium and phosphorus, and also of nitrogen, were markedly increased in a group of 7 children as active caries became

(Footnotes continued on next page) inactive. It should be noted that a considerable number of

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