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January 1940

BIOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF THE SALIVA OF ESKIMOS: CORRELATED WITH DENTAL CARIES AND THE OCCURRENCE OF SALIVARY CALCULUS

Am J Dis Child. 1940;59(1):39-44. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1940.01990120041003
Abstract

Stimulated and unstimulated salivas of persons with and without dental caries have been studied extensively in an effort to determine whether differences occur in certain salivary characteristics.1 In most studies of this kind higher mean values for total calcium, inorganic phosphate and carbon dioxide capacity were found for caries-free persons than for persons with active caries. The differences between the means were in some instances either definitely significant statistically or bordering on significance. Persons who had inactive decay or could not be placed in either the caries-free group or the group with active caries yielded less consistent results, resembling the former group in some characteristics and the latter group in others.2 For Kuskokwim Eskimos without caries and with active caries, Karshan, Rosebury and Waugh3 reported differences in the mean values for calcium, inorganic phosphate and carbon dioxide capacity of stimulated saliva which were similar in direction to

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