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Case Reports
May 1940

CAPILLARY HEMANGIOMA WITH EXTENSIVE PURPURA: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Presbyterian Hospital and the Babies Hospital and the Department of Radiology and Pediatrics, the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University.

Am J Dis Child. 1940;59(5):1063-1070. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1940.01990160135009
Abstract

Benign vascular tumors may occur in any tissue in the body. The skin is the structure most commonly affected. From histopathologic studies, according to Stout,1 hemangiomas of the skin may be divided into two groups: those of the capillary or telangiectatic type, which consist of numerous tubules lined by endothelium and surrounded by cellular intercapillary tissue of varying thickness, and those of the cavernous type, in which blood channels are irregular and more widely dilated. Lymphangiomas are mainly composed of capillaries containing lymph or of widened cystic lymph spaces. Not infrequently both lymph and blood vessel channels may be found in the same tumor, which is then described as a hemangiolymphangioma. The most characteristic feature of the angioma is its red or purple color, of varying intensity, which is due to the large blood content of the tumor.

Thrombopenic purpura associated with benign hemangioma is rare. In fact, we

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