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August 1940

HOSPITAL INFECTIONS: III. A WARD STUDY FOR SOURCES OF INFECTION

Am J Dis Child. 1940;60(2):322-332. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1940.02000020076007
Abstract

A survey of the records of the Infants' Hospital of Boston for 1935 and 1936 showed that in 185 of the 1,455 patients admitted during the two year period infections developed in the hospital.1 The only representative of the common contagious diseases among these infections was pertussis, of which a single case occurred, and there was no hospital infection with enteric organisms. Acute infections of the respiratory tract made up 59.8 per cent of the secondary disorders, while the next largest group was cutaneous infections, which made up 15.6 per cent. It was apparent that 906 patients with acute respiratory disease (including pneumonia) who were admitted during the two year period as well as members of the staff, attendants and visitors with similar conditions presented the great source of danger in the wards.

Jacobi2 described conditions existing in 1871 in regard to morbidity and mortality in a home

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