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Case Reports
December 1940

AGENESIS OF THE CORPUS CALLOSUM: DIAGNOSIS OF A CASE BY ENCEPHALOGRAPHY

Author Affiliations

DULUTH, MINN.; MADISON, WIS.
From St. Luke's Hospital, Duluth, Minn., and the Department of Neuropsychiatry, University of Wisconsin Medical School.

Am J Dis Child. 1940;60(6):1381-1385. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1940.02000060141014
Abstract

Many obscure disturbances of the central nervous system in infancy and childhood are ascribed to birth injury when disease appears to have been present at birth or in the first months of life or to encephalitis when it appears later. Irish,1 in a study of 1,000 cases of vascular encephalopathy in which necropsy had been performed, found that 4.4 per cent of the patients were under 20 years of age. Twenty-five of the 40 patients were children under 10 years. A variety of agents were considered to be causative of the condition; in a few instances there was no apparent explanation for the apoplectic death. Obscure cases of hemiplegia in childhood are usually ascribed to encephalitis. Irish pointed out that evidence from anatomic studies fails to substantiate this view, and he concluded that diseased and otherwise defective blood vessels are responsible for most of the focalized neurologic disturbances in

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