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Progress in Pediatrics
January 1941

CONGENITAL INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE VALUE OF THE PLAIN ROENTGENOGRAM FOR DIAGNOSIS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Departments of Pediatrics and Radiology of the Beth Israel and Jewish Maternity Hospitals.

Am J Dis Child. 1941;61(1):135-149. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1941.02000070144013
Abstract

The prognosis for congenital intestinal obstruction has changed materially since 1927. Prior to this date, authorities were unanimous in predicting an almost uniformly fatal outcome after a brief illness.1 In view of the fact that previously only 4 patients were known to have survived, this estimate of the mortality was an understatement. Since that date, reports of increasing numbers of patients successfully treated surgically have led both pediatricians and surgeons to recommend, with some optimism, immediate surgical intervention in cases of congenital obstruction of the bowel.

The first successful operations were performed in 1897,2 1910,3 1916,4 19245 and 1926.6 In 1927 there were reports of a number of similarly fortunate operative results.7 Since that year, equally happy reports have appeared at not infrequent intervals. Loitman,7a in 1927, and Webb and Wangensteen,8 in 1931, were the first to sound an encouraging note

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