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Case Reports
March 1941

LEAD ENCEPHALOPATHY: TWO CASES, WITH A HYPOTHESIS OF THE BIOCHEMICAL PATHOGENESIS

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN
From the Department of Pediatrics of the Jewish Hospital, Dr. Benjamin Kramer, Director.

Am J Dis Child. 1941;61(3):547-556. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1941.02000090123011
Abstract

In 1932 Shelling suggested the use of a high phosphorus, low calcium diet in the therapy of acute plumbism. Since then several reports have appeared in the literature indicating the beneficial effect of a diet rich in phosphorus in the treatment of lead poisoning. In the pediatric service of the Jewish Hospital of Brooklyn, a number of patients with plumbism have been successfully treated by this means. Patients with mild and moderate lead encephalopathy have responded well. However, the mortality in children manifesting convulsions due to lead poisoning still remains high, because no satisfactory means of controlling the convulsions is yet known to medical science. Of 8 children with lead poisoning treated in the pediatric ward since 1932, 6 recovered, making a mortality of 25 per cent. All of the 8 manifested some symptoms of lead encephalopathy. The patients with mild encephalopathy were characterized by listlessness and irritability, those with

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